Noake's Worcestershire Page 263

MALVERN. 263

Munn rector; population 271; entirely agricultural. In 1563 there were thirteen families at Madresfield and three at Clevelode. There are not quite 1,200 acres in the parish; rather strong land, suitable for wheat and beans, and produces very good cider and perry, with a few hops. There is a school here endowed with 3,000 by John Reginald Pindar, Earl Beauchamp, which usually educates about forty-five children (some of whom are from Malvern), and is well reported of by the Government Inspector; and the Rector has established a clothing club. The same Earl also bequeathed 60,000 for building and endowing almshouses at Madresfield for decayed agricultural labourers. This noble institution has, however, been established at Newland, an adjoining parish, and will therefore be described when I come to that place. The Beauchamp (Lygon) family have always been immensely popular in Worcestershire, and represented the county in Parliament for ninety-one years with scarcely a break. The present Earl gives fair promise, by his munificent gifts, kindness of heart, and sparkling abilities, to preserve the traditions and the fair fame of his ancient and honoured house.

Malvern.

THE modern development of Malvern is a recognition of the sanitary agency of pure air and water, bracing exercise, and charming scenery. Formerly what is called Malvern Wells was the only part of the hills where visitors stopped, and the village proper consisted of little more than one row of houses. There were only 105 families here in the time of Elizabeth, but at the census of 1861 the population of the parish numbered between six and seven thousand, and is of course largely increased in the summer season. Within a small radius round the hills there